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Manufacturing Job Profiles: Machinist and Tooling Inspector

According to data collected by the EOMWDP, a machinist and tooling inspector is the 9th most popular job in eastern Ontario. These jobs are ideal for people who have strong attention to detail, can read and interpret engineering drawings, and can explain complicated ideas in a simple, clear way. 

Machinist and Tooling Inspectors Are in High Demand

These two skilled jobs need to be filled across the manufacturing sector in eastern Ontario. Let’s learn a little more about them so you can decide if these job opportunities are a good fit for your career.

Machinist (NOC 2016)

A machinist’s job tasks include: reading and interpreting engineering drawings, blueprints, charts and tables or studying sample parts to determine machining operation to be performed, and planning the best sequence of operations.

Machinists also set up, operate and maintain a variety of machine tools, including computer numerically controlled (CNC) tools to perform precision, non-repetitive machining operations, such as sawing, turning, milling, boring, planing, drilling, precision grinding and other operations.

For a machinist position, according to StatsCan, “completion of secondary school is usually required. Completion of a four-year apprenticeship program or a combination of over four years of work experience and industry courses in machining is usually required to be eligible for trade certification.”

The average annual full-time machinist salary in Canada is $48,600 per year or $24 an hour. A machinist job also allows for advancement to a supervisory position with experience.

Tooling Inspector (NOC 2011)

Tooling inspectors need to have strong attention to detail, be able to communicate complicated technical ideas with precision and clarity, have good physical mobility, as well as be able to lift heavy objects.

Tooling inspectors verify dimensions of machined parts or tooling using micrometers, verniers, callipers, height gauges, optical comparators, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) or other specialized measuring instruments.

Tooling inspectors maintain, repair and calibrate precision measuring instruments, such as dial indicators, fixed gauges, height gauges and other measuring devices. They also report deviations from specifications and tolerances to the supervisor. A tooling inspector has room for advancement to a supervisory position with experience.

For a tooling inspector position, according to StatsCan, “completion of secondary school is usually required. Completion of a four-year apprenticeship program or a combination of over four years of work experience in the trade and some college or industry courses in machining is usually required to be eligible for trade certification.”

The average full-time tooling inspector salary in Canada is $74, 050.

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The Effect of Automation on These Job Opportunities

A recent study by McKinsey found the jobs that will be most impacted by automation are, “tasks that hang on processing or collecting data, and operating machinery in predictable environments.”

There are 3 things that remain difficult for machines to master, however, and demand a human presence on the job.

  • Social intelligence — The ability to negotiate and persuade, to respond to the emotional cues of others, and to impart knowledge.
  • Complex manipulation — The ability to deftly handle, move and control objects in a variety of settings, using fine muscle control.
  • Creativity — The ability to conceive of novel ideas and to create art and design that pushes cultural boundaries.

These skills are in high demand in the manufacturing industry and can only be found in human workers.

Machinist and tooling inspector jobs have a 65% chance of changing due to automation. So how can someone interested in these jobs weather the change?

If machines take over part of a machinist’s or tooling inspector’s job, people will still be needed to program (code) and maintain those machines.

Find Out How to Prepare for High Demand Manufacturing Jobs

Jobs of the Future E-book

References:

https://neuvoo.ca/salary/?job=General%20Machinist

http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p3VD.pl?Function=getVD&TVD=314243&CVD=314247&CPV=7231&CST=01012016&CLV=4&MLV=4

http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p3VD.pl?CLV=4&CPV=7231&CST=01012011&CVD=122376&Function=getVD&MLV=4&TVD=122372

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-work/jobs-lost-jobs-gained-what-the-future-of-work-will-mean-for-jobs-skills-and-wages

https://medium.com/@thersa/how-will-automation-change-the-nature-of-work-f5df09608eea

http://www.tradeready.ca/2016/topics/import-export-trade-management/risk-replaced-robot-automated-system/

 

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